Avoiding a Cake Disaster

Avoiding-a-cake-disaster

It’s 2007 and my sister is graduating from college. Tasked with bringing the cake for her graduation party, I called a local grocery store, spoke with someone in the bakery department, and placed my order. Being the cool older sister that I was (and still am), I requested the cake to say “Class of 2007 Rocks!” along with some exploding fireworks instead of some lame expected graduation cap or diploma. With my order placed, I checked it off my to-do list and went on with my day. Fast forward a few weeks to graduation day, and I call to confirm the cake is ready to pick up. Indeed it was, hooray! Pressed for time, I ran into the store to pick up and pay for the cake, hastily making my way to the party. Once at my mom’s house, I opened the box only to see this as the big reveal:
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Cake Disaster

 

WHAT IS THIS?? WHAT KIND OF PERSON THOUGHT THIS IS WHAT I WANTED?? DIDN’T I EXPLAIN MYSELF?? WHY IN THE WORLD WOULD THEY WRITE “FIREWORKS EXPLOSION,” CLEARLY THAT’S NOT WHAT I INTENDED!! THEY OBVIOUSLY WEREN’T THINKING!!!

Well, none of this story is true*, but it still makes a great point: THINK. As design professionals, we strive to be more than brainless executors of instructions. We want to make sure we understand the intent of our client’s thoughts, comments, feedback and revisions. For example, we could just copy and paste the text going into a printed piece and be done with it. But, we could also think about it:

What message are they trying to convey?
Is all of that content going to fit on a small postcard, or should we suggest a brochure?
Is this a complete sentence?
Did they really mean to misspell that word?
Didn’t they recently change their phone number, and should that be reflected here?

We ask questions. A lot. It’s our best practice to ask or confirm these kinds of questions because our goal is to create and provide the best results for our client. We hope they appreciate receiving an extra confirmation email or a simple double-check of their request instead of receiving a thoughtless cake disaster.
 
 
*This cake disaster, and others can be found here.

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